Wednesday, October 27, 2010

Irene's Apple Banana Bread

                                                                           
Irene's Apple Banana Bread

1/2 cup butter, softened
1/2 cup brown sugar
1/2 cup sugar
2 eggs
3 Tbls. sour cream
1 banana, mashed
1 tsp. vanilla extract
2 cups flour
1 tsp. baking powder
1 tsp. baking soda
1/2 tsp. cinnamon
2 apples peeled, cored, and chopped
1/2 cup chopped walnuts

Preheat oven to 350 degrees.
Grease a 9"x5" loaf pan; set aside.
Cream butter and sugars; add eggs and beat well. Stir in sour cream, banana, and vanilla. In separate bowl, combine flour with baking powder, baking soda, and cinnamon. Gradually add to batter, mixing well. Gently stir in apples and walnuts. Pour into prepared loaf pan and bake at 350 degrees for one hour, testing with a toothpick to make sure it is done. Let cool 5 minutes in pan, then invert onto cooling rack. Once cool, wrap well in plastic wrap and let ripen overnight. This can be frozen if wrapped well.

Irene's York Sensational Brownies

                                                                       

These are a cake-like brownie. For a more dense brownie, omit the baking powder and bake about 40-45 minutes.

Irene's York Sensational Brownies

1 1/2 cups butter, room temperature
3 cups sugar
1 Tbls. vanilla extract
5 eggs
2 cups flour
1 cup unsweetened cocoa
1 tsp. baking powder
1 tsp. salt
24 small Peppermint Patties, unwrapped

Preheat oven to 350 degrees.
Grease 13"x9" pan; set aside.
In medium bowl, beat together butter, sugar, and vanilla till light and fluffy. Add eggs, one at a time, till well incorporated. In a bowl, combine flour, cocoa, baking powder and salt. Add to the creamed mixture and blend well. Reserve 2 cups batter. Pour remaining batter into prepared pan. Arrange Peppermint Patties in single layer over batter, about half inch apart. Spread the remaining batter evenly over top. Bake 50-55 minutes or until brownies begin to pull away from sides of pan.
Cool completely on wire rack. Cut into squares. Makes about 36 brownies.

Irene's 14 Carat Cake

                                                                               

Irene's 14 Carat Cake

1 3/4 cup unbleached flour
1/4 cup whole wheat flour
2 cups sugar

2 tsps. baking powder
1 1/2 tsps. baking soda
2 tsps. cinnamon
1/2 tsp. cloves
1 tsp. salt
1 1/2 cups oil*
8 ounces crushed pineapple, drained
2 cups grated carrots
1/2 cup walnuts, chopped
1 cup shredded or flaked coconut
4 eggs, beaten
1/2 cup apricot jam
3/4 cup walnuts, ground

Cream Cheese Frosting

1- 8 ounce cream cheese, room temperature
1 stick real butter, room temperature
1 pound box powdered sugar, sifted
1 tsp. real vanilla extract

Preheat oven to 350 degrees.
Grease and flour three 9" round pans.
Sift together flour, wheat flour, sugar, baking powder, baking soda, cinnamon, cloves, and salt. Add 1/2 cup walnuts; set aside.
Combine oil*, pineapple, and carrots. Mix with eggs and coconut, beat well. Add dry ingredients and blend well; mix for about 2 minutes on medium speed of electric mixer.
Pour batter into prepared pans. Bake at 350 degrees for 30-35 minutes, or until tests done. Cool 10 minutes in pan, then invert onto wire racks to cool.
While cake is cooling make frosting. Cream together the cheese and butter till well blended. Add sugar and vanilla, beat till well mixed and fluffy.
When cake is cool, melt jam in a small sauce pan, brush middle layer with the jam. Frost top of each cake (including over jam in middle layer) with frosting, placing one layer on top of the other till you have all 3 layers together. Frost sides and top of cake. Place ground walnuts on sides of cake. Keep leftovers in fridge.
Serves 12-15 people.

Irene's Sausage Stuffing

                                                                       
Irene's Sausage Stuffing

 1 1/2 pound pork sausage
1 cup celery, finely chopped
1 large onion, chopped
4 McIntosh apples, peeled, cored, and chopped fine
1 Tbls. dried parsley
2 tsps. dried sage
1 tsp. dried oregano
1 ts. dried thyme
1 1/2 tsps. real sea salt, or to taste
1/2 tsp black pepper, or to taste
2/3 cups walnuts, chopped
24 ounces unseasoned toasted bread cubes
1/4 cup butter, melted
2 cups hot chicken broth or water

Cook sausage in a skillet, breaking up with a fork, until browned and no longer pink; drain fat.
Place sausage, celery, onion, apples, spices, and walnuts in a large bowl, combine with bread cubes, pour butter and broth over top; toss gently.
Spoon some stuffing into turkey cavity and the rest in a casserole dish.
Bake stuffing at 375 degrees for 35-40 minutes.

Irene's Amish Dressing

                                                                              
Cousin Renie makes a lot of good rib-sticking foods for her family. She is a lot of fun to be around, likes to get together with family, and loves her kids and grandkids. She makes a 'famous' sausage dressing, which she didn't share here, but here is a dressing she also likes to make. Her three children would tell you she's a wonderful cook as she loves to make wonderful meals for her family.

Irene's Amish Dressing

Two- 1 pound loaves good quality bread (white or wheat, or a mixture), cut in 1 inch cubes
 2 pounds poached chicken thighs
1/2 cup minced fresh parsley
1 cup chopped onion
1 cup chopped celery
1 cup shredded carrots
1 1/4 cups finely chopped boiled potatoes
1 Tbls. rubbed sage
1 Tbls. celery seed
1 tsp. dried thyme
1/2 tsp. ground turmeric
5 eggs
1- 12 ounce can evaporated milk, shaken
2 1/2 cups homemade or canned chicken broth

On 2 cookie sheets, toast the bread cubes for 15 minutes, or until the bread is golden brown. Place bread cubes in large mixing bowl or pot. Bone the chicken and chop the meat fine, reserve the skin for gravy or stock. Add all the chopped vegetables and meat to the bread, along with seasonings. Toss to mix.
In a medium bowl, combine eggs, milk, and broth. Pour over the bread mixture and stir. Will be quite moist.
Allow to stand for one hour.
Preheat oven to 350 degrees. Pour dressing into a large casserole pan at least 3 inches deep, if possible, or divide between pans. Do not overcrowd. Either cover well with foil and freeze for the future (within 2 months of making, thaw before baking) or place into oven to bake now. Bake for 2 hours or until dressing puffs up in center and is golden brown on top.

Becky's Chicken And Rice Casserole

                                                                      
Becky is my ex-daughter-in-law and the mother of four of my grandkids. Becky would rather wire a lamp, fix one's brakes, or plumb a bathroom than cook.. This is one of her kids' favorite meals.

Becky's Chicken And Rice Casserole

4 boneless chicken breasts, cut into strips
1 small box of instant white rice
1 jar salsa (12-16 ounce)
32 ounce container of V-8 Hot and Spicy drink
8 ounces finely shredded mozzarella cheese

Preheat oven to 375 degrees.
Place chicken strips in a 9"x13" casserole pan. Cover with rice, pour salsa over top, then add 3/4 of V-8. Bake until rice and chicken are done, about 30-40 minutes, stirring occasionally. Add more V-8 as needed. Sprinkle with cheese and bake till melted.

Aunt Cathy's Stromboli

                                                                     

Aunt Cathy's Stromboli

3 loaves of raw frozen bread dough, thawed*
olive oil
oregano
Sharp Cheddar cheese slices
1/2 pound boiled ham slices
4 ounces sandwich pepperoni slices
1/4 cup grated Parmesan cheese
2 Tbls. butter
2 medium onions, chopped
2 green peppers, chopped
2 small cans (4 ounces each) mushrooms, drained
Marinara sauce, warmed

Punch down dough and roll into large rectangle. Brush with oil and sprinkle with oregano, to taste. Lay on cheese slices and meats. Sprinkle with grated Parmesan cheese.
Saute' onions, green peppers, and mushrooms in the butter in a skillet. Place this on top of cheese. Roll up like jelly roll and seal edges. You can brush with a bit of oil and oregano on top, if desiired.
Bake at 350 degrees for about 35 minutes or until golden brown. Cut in slices.
Serve with warmed marinara sauce.

*You can make your own bread recipe~including making it whole wheat bread.

Aunt Cathy's Chicken Enchiladas

                                                                              
Everyone needs an Aunt Cathy! She's fun, to the point, and easily riled. She is there when you really need her, and she has been part of our family for more than 40 years. Most of my memories have her as part of them, and she also played an integral role in helping us to birth our babies. Cathy makes many good dishes, but she only sent a couple my way which I will post here.

Aunt Cathy's Chicken Enchiladas

2 cups chopped cooked chicken or turkey
1 cup chopped green bell pepper
1 pkg (8 ounces) cream cheese, cubed
1 jar (8 ounces) salsa, divided
8 (6 inch) flour tortillas
3/4 pound (12 ounces) Velveeta cheese, cut up
1/4 cup milk

Stir chicken, pepper, cream cheese, and 1/2 cup salsa in sauce pan on low heat until cream cheese is melted.
Spoon 1/3 cup chicken mixture down center of each tortilla; roll up. Place seam side down in lightly greased 12"x8" baking dish.
Stir processed cheese and milk in sauce pan on low; heat till smooth. Pour cheese sauce over tortillaas; cover with foil. Bake at 350 degrees for 20 minutes or until thoroughly heated. Pour remaining salsa over tortillas before serving. Makes 4-6 servings.

Wednesday, October 20, 2010

Angie's Dessert Pizza


I don't know anyone who does not like fruit pizza. This dessert can look stunning, or it can look rustic, it all depends on the fruits used and how much time you put into decorating it. Angie likes to use fresh strawberries, bananas, and kiwi, alternating the slices so that you get all the fruit in each piece when cut.

Angie's Dessert Pizza

1- 18 ounce pkg, Refrigerated sugar cookie dough*
1 pkg (8 ounce) cream cheese, softened
1/3 cup sugar
Fruits of your choice
Fresh lemon juice, optional

Preheat oven to 350 degrees. Press cookie dough evenly into a 12" pizza pan that has been greased. If you do not have a pizza pan, then form into a 12" wheel on a greased baking stone. Use a rolling pin, if need be (place plastic wrap over top of dough in order to keep it from sticking to rolling pin) to form your round. Bake until golden brown, about 10 minutes, but do not overbake. Carefully loosen cookie dough from the pan using a knife. Cool completely.
Meanwhile, combine cream cheese and sugar; beat well and set aside. Cut up all fruits that need to be sliced, dipping those fruits that brown easily in the lemon juice before decorating the pie.
Spread the cooled cookie dough evenly with the cream cheese mixture, then top artfully with the fruits. Cover and chill before serving.
*You can make your own cookie dough.

                                                                    

Alice and Angie's Watergate Cake

                                                                    

If this isn't 1970's I don't know what is! For whatever reason, a dozen or so recipes using pistachio pudding mix came out and all were dubbed with"Watergate"in the name. Now we all know about the Watergate Scandal that happened in 1974, but why pistachio pudding mix was used is what puzzles me, but it is easy to date these recipes to the 1974/75 years.
I remember Alice making this cake to take to church functions, to have for us kids to eat, and for special times. It is a moist and refreshing cake. If you like Watergate Salad, you will like this cake.
Angie now makes this cake for special occasions and so it has become one of her personal recipes .

Alice and Angie's Watergate Cake

1 Box (18 3/4 ounces) white cake mix
1 pkg (3 3/4 ounces) instant pistachio pudding mix
3 eggs
1 cup oil*
1 cup Club soda or 7Up
1/2 cup walnuts, chopped
Frosting, follows

In large mixing bowl combine cake mix, pudding mix, eggs, oil, and 7Up; beat on medium speed for 4 minutes, scraping down sides occasionally. Stir in walnuts.Use either a 10" tube pan or 2-9" round cake pans, well greased and floured. Pour batter in pan(s) and bake at 350 degrees for 45-50 minutes or until tests done. Cool for 15 minutes, then remove from pan(s) to cooling rack. Cool completely before frosting.
Store all leftovers covered in the refrigerator.
*use light olive oil

Watergate Frosting

2 pkgs. Dream Whip
1 1/2 cups milk
1 pkg (3 3/4 ounce) instant pistachio pudding mix

With electric mixer beat the Dream Whip and milk until peaks form. Add in the pudding mix and beat till fluffy. Store any leftovers in the refrigerator.

Angie's Italian Cream Cake


 

This is a rich cake that will make people come back for more. A lovely cake to serve for birthdays, holidays, or to take for pot luck.

Angie's Italian Cream Cake

1 stick butter (1/2 cup)
1/2 cup shortening*
2 cups sugar
5 eggs, separated
1 cup buttermilk
1 tsp. baking soda
2 cups flour
1 cup coconut
1 cup chopped pecans
2 tsps. real vanilla extract
Frosting, follows

Cream butter, shortening, and sugar till light and fluffy. Add eggs yolks, beat well. Beat egg whites until they are stiff and hold peaks; set aside. Combine the buttermilk and baking soda, then add alternately to the creamed mixture with the flour, beginning and ending with flour. Add vanilla. Stir in coconut and pecans. Fold in egg whites. Pour into well-greased 10" tube pan or bundt pan and bake at 350 degrees for one hour or until tests done. Allow to cool in pan for 10 minutes before inverting onto wire rack to cool. When completely cool, frost. You may garnish with whole nutmeats, if desired. Keep chilled until time to serve.
You can make these in 9" rounds; adjust the baking time.

Cream Cheese Frosting

8 ounces cream cheese, room temperature
1 ound of powdered sugar, sifted
1 tsp. vanilla

Beat the cheese, then add in sugar and vanilla, beat till creamy. For a richer and creamier icing add 1 stick softened butter and beat with the cheese before adding sugar and vanilla.




                                                                                   

Angie's Awesome Nacho Cheese Dip

                                                                               

If you are headed for a potluck, having friends over to play cards, or tailgating, this dip will make you a favorite of the party. It is easy and totes well.

Angie's Awesome Nacho Cheese Dip

32 ounce pkg. of Velveeta
1 can Rotel mild diced tomatoes with chiles
1/3 pound of Eckrich sausage

Cut cheese into chunks and melt in crock pot. Meanwhile, cut sausage into small pieces fry in skillet until cooked through. Drain on paper towels. Once cheese is melted, add sausage pieces and tomatoes to pot; stir well to blend. Keep crock pot on warm setting. Serve with corn tortilla chips. Serves 8.
This recipe can be doubled for large parties. The doubled recipe will fill a 6 quart crock pot 3/4 full.

Angie's Chicken Swiss Bake

                                                                           
My sister Angie has lived away from home most of her adult life. When I say 'away from home' I mean far-off places such as Japan, Hawaii, and Georgia. She is currently residing near Augusta and seems to like it. She's come home to visit over the years, but she is always ready to head back to her own neck of the woods. Growing up, Angie was not one to experiment in the kitchen, but once married, she became a good cook who enjoyed feeding her family.
Angie stayed home the majority of the past 20 years in order to raise her children. She is now working for Lens Crafters and enjoys her job. Her daughter, Gabby, often does the cooking for the household, and I am sure she has learned all she knows from Angie.
This dish is easily made and good enough for company. To round it out add some mashed potatoes, green beans, and homemade biscuits for a rib-sticking meal.


Angie's Chicken Swiss Bake

4 chicken breasts (boiled or baked and cut into bite-sized pieces)
4 slices Swiss cheese
1 can (10 3/4 ounces) cream of chicken soup*
1 soup can milk
16 ounces sour cream*
Small bag Pepperridge Farm Stuffng Mix*
Butter

Lightly grease a 13"x9" pan. Layer items in order in pan; dot with butter, cover with foil. Bake at 350 degrees for one hour, then uncover and bake another 15 minutes.

*You could make a medium white sauce using chicken broth for the soup.
*Make sure you buy real sour cream without additives.
*You could make your own stuffing mix from day old bread and spices.

Kym's Baker's Clay

                                                                         
If you read the beginning of this date's blogs you read that Kym made salt dough ornaments for Tim and Carrie when they were very young. Kym loves to do crafts, and salt dough crafts is one she's enjoyed making over the years. This is a craft you can do with your children. These make cute gifts for Christmas.

Kym's Baker's Clay

2 cups flour
1/2 cup table salt
3/4 cup water

Place flour and salt in a large bowl and blend well together. Add 1/2 cup water and continue to mix for a few minutes then slowly add the remaining water. While turning the dough into a ball, work in any dry flour or salt left at bottom of bowl. Knead dough for five minutes.
Roll dough out to about 1/4" thickness, and cut with cookie cutters of your choice. To attach extra pieces such as eyes, legs, arms, etc, use 1 drop of water. With a toothpick, make a hole at the top big enough for a string or ribbon to go through when finished.
Place ornaments on an ungreased baking sheet. Bake dough at 250 degrees until hard, about 15 minutes. When cool, pain with acrylic paints; let dry. Finish with one coat of varnish to help keep product for years.

Kym's Potato Casserole

                                                                               
                                                                                      
Everyone seems to make this dish and so it is not truly just Kym's, but since she is the one who originally sent me this recipe, I am including this as part of her recipes. I do believe every church cook book across our fine nation has this exact same recipe in its covers, or one very similar. Great recipes get passed around and become popular with everyone. And everyone adds their own tweak to this recipe in one form or another. I rarely add the corn flakes, much to my Bob's chagrin, and some people add all soup and no sour cream. However you like this dish, here is Kym's recipe:

Kym's Potato Casserole

2 pound bag of frozen hashbrowns, thawed
1 stick (1/2 cup) butter
1/4 tsp. pepper
1 tsp. salt*
1/2 cup chopped onion
1 can (10 3/4 ounces) cream of chicken soup, undiluted*
16 ounces of sour cream*
10-16 ounces of Cheddar cheese, grated
1 1/2 cups crushed corn flakes*
1/4 cup melted butter

Pour 1 stick melted butter over thawed potatoes in a large bowl. Add salt and pepper; blend. Add onion, soup, sour cream, and cheese. Stir well. Pour into a 13"x9" pan. Combine corn flake crumbs with 1/4 cup melted butter and sprinkle over top of casserole. Bake at 325 degrees for 45 to 60 minutes until hot and bubbly.

*Use sea salt, if possible.
*You can make your own 'soup' by making a basic medium sauce using chicken broth.
*Make sure your sour cream is pure without any additives such as guar gum.
*Try to buy organic, if at all possible in order to avoid using GMO corn.

Kym's Cream of Broccoli Soup

                                                                                 

Kym loves soups~bean, potato, onion, and broccoli. Soup served up with a fresh salad and a hearty loaf of homemade peasant bread would round out this meal for any family. This is one of those soups that would be good served for lunch or dinner.

Kym's Cream of Broccoli Soup

1 bunch of fresh broccoli
1/2 cup butter
1/2 cup flour
7 cups milk*
4 chicken bouillon cubes*
2 tsp. season salt (optional)*
1/4 tsp. pepper
1 cup Cheddar cheese, grated*

Chop broccoli very fine and cover with water, cook until tender, about 20 minutes. Drain and set aside. Melt butter in a heavy-bottomed 6 quart pot. Stir in flour and cook until bubbly. Add milk, seasonings, and bouillon cubes; whisk constantly until thickened and just beginning to bubble. Stir in broccoli, then cheese. Stir till cheese is melted and well-blended into soup. Serves 5-8

*If this is too rich for you, substitute 4-5 cups of the milk with chicken broth. If you are lactose intolerant, then substitute all chicken broth for the milk.
*If using bouillon cubes then make sure they are a brand such as Herb-Ox that is MSG-free. If using chicken broth you can omit these all together unless you want a richer tasting soup.
*Real sea salt (pink or grey) can be used in place of the seasoned salt.
*You can also make your own seasoned salt in order to avoid the MSG in Lawry's and similar products.
Here is a good recipe that might work for you:
http://www.food.com/recipe/lawrys-original-seasoned-salt-copycat-425753
*You might like to double the cheese if you really like yours cheesy.

Kym's Poor Man's Steak

                                                                            
Kym loves home-style foods that are easily prepared, tasty, and sticks to the ribs of those who eat them. This is one of those meals that is perfect for a cold fall day when you want something a little out of the ordinary, but cheap and easy to prepare. Your kids will love this dish as it is warm and comforting. Those of us who are older will recognize this as Salisbury Steak, a dish we all grew up with. I've made this for my family and my kids all loved it, especially Robert. This is started the night before you want to serve it, and it does take some preparation and planning, about 2 1/2 hours before you want to have dinner, but it is worth the effort and time.

Kym's Poor Man's Steak

2 pounds hamburger*
1 egg
Salt and pepper, to taste
1/2 cup milk
1 cup fine bread crumbs*
Flour*
Extra Virgin Olive oil or lard
1 can Cream of Mushroom soup, diluted with 1 can water or milk*

Mix together the first 5 ingredients;  pat in the bottom of a 13"x9" pan. Cover and refrigerate overnight. Cut into cube steak-sized squares. Pour about 1/4 cup oil in a heavy skillet and warm to medium heat.Dredge each meat square in flour, coating all sides, then place in skillet to lightly brown on all sides. As meat browns, place back in 13"x9" pan. Once all meat is browned and returned to pan, pour the cream of mushroom soup, diluted into the pan, covering the meat. Bake uncovered at 275 degrees for 2 hours.

*Ground chuck or round steak would be a leaner choice.
*Bread crumbs are easily made by placing any bread you'd like in a food processor or blender and then make into crumbs to measure out for this dish. Leftover sourdough would be excellent.
*Unbleached flour would be a better choice.
*It is very easy to make your own mushroom soup base instead of buying canned soups. Here is a link to an easy and quick mushroom soup recipe~
 http://www.professorshouse.com/food-beverage/food/homemade-mushroom-soup.aspx

Kym's One Pot Macaroni and Beef

                                                                         
This is one of those meals that can be made in about a half hour and served to a hungry family without much thought or preparation, and yet is filling and easily rounded out with a loaf of fresh bread and a salad. Who needs Hamburger Helper@ when such easy and nourishing meals as this can be so easily made?

Kym's One Pot Macaroni and Beef

1 1/2 pounds ground beef
1 medium onion, chopped
1 green pepper, chopped
2 cups elbow macaroni, uncooked
2- 8 ounce cans tomato sauce
1 tsp. salt
1/4 tsp. pepper
1 tsp. Worcestershire Sauce

Brown ground beef with onion and green pepper in a large skillet. Stir until crumbly; drain. Add remaining ingredients and half cup water; mix well. Simmer, covered for 25 minutes or until macaroni is tender. Add more water, if necessary. Serve immediately. Makes 4 1/2 servings

Kym's Happy Home Recipe

                                                                          
                                                                          
Since today is Kym's birthday I figured I would type in her recipes. Kym is 50 today, and she had her first round of chemo today for stage 4 cancer of the lung that has metastasized and gone to her endocrine glands and pancreas. We are hoping and praying for a miracle, but in the meantime, there is life for her to be lived, and she needs to focus on getting well.
Kym has never been one who enjoyed cooking or baking too much, though she has done both over the years. She prefers to sew or do crafts, to play games on Facebook, and to hang out with her friends. She has made many beautiful keepsakes over the years for others to enjoy~mainly in cross stitch, and I have been the lucky recipient of some very nice pieces, as have my children. She's also made many homemade Christmas ornaments for each one of my children. The first ornaments were made for Tim and Carrie and were made of salt dough. After about 15 years, these fell apart and crumbled. Then she discovered she loved to cross stitch and all other ornaments have been cross stitched.
One of the 'recipes' Kym sent to me around twenty years ago is one on a happy home as she has always loved poems and folksy-style, heart-felt sayings. So I will include this as a tribute to her today for her birthday, and a prayer to God Most High that she will have many years to enjoy her own happy home.

A Happy Home Recipe

4 cups of love
2 cups of loyalty
3 cups of kindness
1 cup of friendship
5 Tbls. of hope
2 Tbls of tenderness
4 quarts of faith
1 barrel of laughter

Take love and understanding, mix it thoroughly with faith. Blend with tenderness, kindness, and hope. Add friendship and loyalty; sprinkle abundantly with laughter. Bake with sunshine. Serve daily with generous helpings of love.


Peanut Butter Rounds Dog Biscuits



Scott's friend, Ann Tuder, passed this recipe on to some of us a few years ago. I am going to copy this as she wrote it, then amend it to make it more healthy. Even though these are treats for dogs, we want our canine pets to be heart healthy, too.

Peanut Butter Rounds Dog Biscuits

1 1/2 cups flour
3/4 cup oats
1 teaspoon baking powder
1/4 cup honey
1/4 cup salad oil
1/4 cup peanut butter
1/4 cup water
1/4 cup wheat germ

Mix all ingredients together well. Pinch off small amounts about the size of a flat teaspoon.
Roll into a ball and place on ungreased baking sheet. Flatten slightly with a fork.
Bake in a 325 degree oven for 20 minutes. Cool completely before storing.
freezes well. Yield: 60
*To make these much more healthy~replace the flour with wheat flour, the salad oil with olive oil, and make sure the peanut butter contains no hydrogenated fats.

Wednesday, April 14, 2010

Scott's Soss


This is not a typo, this is how Scott really spelled this sauce. He came up with this recipe many years ago and everyone loves it. I remember when Scott had a lot of us over for dinner one night: our folks, Bob and I, Kym, Bob, and Chad, and uncle Tom. We had a great time and enjoyed the food. This makes a huge amount of "soss" but you can freeze or can some for a later date.

Scott's Soss

In cheese cloth add:

2 Tbls. dried basil
2 Tbls. oregano
5 Tbls. parsley
1 bay leaf
6 peppercorns
3 cups chopped onion
3 cups chopped celery with leaves
1 #10 can of plum tomatoes (industrial-sized)
4 cups strong beef broth
12 ounce tomato paste
1 pound pork necks wrapped in cheese cloth

Tie the herbs up in the cheese cloth so that they won't come out; set aside. In large pot saute' onion and celery till translucent. Add tomatoes, broth, tomato paste, pork necks and herbs to the pot and bring to a slow boil, stirring every 15 minutes for an hour. Simmer for 3 hours, stirring occasionally. Remove the pork necks and herbs; dispose. Use for spaghetti, lasagne, or any other dish calling for sauce.

Scott's Egg Nog French Toast



You could make this with the strata or alone.

Scott's Egg Nog French Toast

3 cups of egg nog plus one egg yolk
Day old Texas toast

Combine the egg nog and yolk in a bowl. Dip the toast in mixture and soak for 30 seconds. Heat butter or oil in skillet, add soaked bread to skillet and cook till done.

Scott's Strata


"This is good Christmas morning or for a Sunday brunch with french toast and Bloody Mary's." This is what Scott had written at the bottom of this recipe. I think I'd pass on the Bloody Mary's, especially for Christmas morning, but french toast might be good.

Scott's Strata

2 Tbls. butter
1 loaf white bread
1 pound cooked sausage
1 medium onion, chopped and cooked with sausage
3 cups Cheddar cheese, grated
12 eggs
1 cup half and half
dash Tobasco
1/4 cup prepared mustard

Grease 9"x14" Pyrex or glass baking dish with butter.
Cut crust from bread and line entire bottom of the dish with the bread. Spread sausage and onions over bread. Spread grated cheese on top of sausage. Mix eggs, milk, mustard, and hot sauce in bowl. Slowly pour egg mixture atop casserole and refrigerate 8 hours or overnight. Bake in a 350 degree oven for 1 hour and 15 minutes. Serves 12-16.

Friday, April 9, 2010

Scott & Alice's Pommery Potato Salad


This is most likely a recipe that Scott ran across years ago. I know he'd been making it for well over 20 years, perhaps as long as 25 years or so. The recipe is a hit everywhere it goes, and rarely did they bring home any leftovers. Look for the Pommery mustard in the imported section of the grocery.

Scott & Alice's Pommery Potato Salad

3 pounds red skin potatoes (small ones, if possible)
1 cup chopped celery
1/2 cup chopped green onions
3 cups Hellmann's Mayonnaise
1/2 cup Pommery mustard
Salt and pepper, to taste
Chopped parsley

*Clean and cut potatoes in bite-sized chunks; cook till firm, not soft. In a bowl, add celery, green onion, mayonnaise, mustard, salt and pepper.  Drain potatoes. Add all the preceding ingredients while potatoes are hot. Stir very lightly. Sprinkle with parsley. Serve warm or chilled.
* You will retain the vitamins and minerals if you cook the potatoes whole and then cut up into chunks once cooked.

Scott's Zucchini Casserole


I do not like zucchini, though I can eat zucchini bread or cake. One summer when our sister Angie came home to visit with the family (her husband was in the military), Scott couldn't come out with us so he sent a zucchini casserole already made up with directions of how to bake it. He made me promise I would at least try it. He told me that this recipe came from a lady who had been married to a farmer, and that it was a great way to use up garden vegetables. Someone had given Scott some extra zucchini and tomatoes and so we ended up with this dish. I tried it like I promised, though I took a very small amount, but I went back for seconds because it was surprisingly good. And that from someone who does not like zucchini! Try this recipe on those in your family who do not like zucchini, and like me, they just might like this dish as it is very delicious. I do not have a recipe with specific amounts, I only have the ingredients and how to make this, so bear with me! The vegetables and cheese, after layered they should be about 1 1/2" from the top of the loaf pan.

Scott's Zucchini Casserole

2-3 young zucchini fresh from the garden or farmer's market, sliced fairly thin
1-2 medium onions, sliced in rings and separated
1-2 fresh ripe tomatoes, cut into quarters or eighths
About 9 slices of American cheese
salt and pepper, to taste
A small handful of saltines crackers, maybe 4-6
1 stick real butter

In a 9"x5" loaf pan, place a layer of about 1/3 of the zucchini, 1/3 of the onions, 1/3 of the tomatoes, some salt and pepper, and 3 slices of cheese angled like a diamond and overlaying across the top. Repeat two more layers ending with the cheese. Crunch up a handful of saltines and sprinkle down the center of the casserole. Divide the butter up in 8 Tbls. and dot the top of the casserole with the butter. Bake at 350 degrees for 30 minutes. The casserole will cook down about 1/4 of the size that it was. Allow to cool a few minutes before spooning out onto plates.

My Brother Scott

Scott Richard
February 13, 1958 - April 6, 2009
     When I was a young child around the age of three in 1963, Scotty lived across the courtyard from us in apartments named Beverly Manor, on the east side of Columbus, Ohio, near Bexley, and not far from Whitehall. Scott and I quickly became the best of friends. He was my first boyfriend. We used to sit outside and lay on the grass on our bellies, hands holding up our chins, as we would scan through the Speigel catalog picking out all the things we would buy when we grew up and got married. I would often wait for him in the afternoons when I knew he'd be walking home from kindergarten. I missed him while he was gone at school.
     Then in 1964 we moved to Whitehall, about five miles or so away, and I rarely saw Scotty anymore. When dad would take us back to The Manor, as we called Beverly Manor, to see Mrs. Harvey, who was a good neighbor and friend, we would sometimes see Scotty, but then we did not see each other for a few years.
 My parents split in 1968. Dad, Kym, and I went to live with our grandparents, and in the summer of 1969, dad would take us over to Mrs. Harvey's for the day to give my grandma a much needed break. We were once again reunited with Scotty, his sister Angie, whom we had not known before, and their mom, Alice. We spent a lot of time between Mrs. Harvey's and Alice's apartment since they lived in the same apartment building, but on different floors.
     In October of 1969 we moved to the Manor. We moved into apartment one, right next door to Mrs. Harvey who lived in apartment two. Alice had lived upstairs in apartment six, but when apartment four became available, she moved across the hall, still on the second floor. We lived directly below them.
     . We had already started at the local elementary school, though Scott and I were in the same grade, we were in different classes. We often walked home together. We were also in and out of each other's apartments on a daily basis, getting to the point where we rarely knocked. The doors were usually standing wide open anyway as many people just left the doors open for air circulation.
     Scott (which is mainly what I called him by this time) and I were not boyfriend/girlfriend at this stage! We'd left that behind in 1964 when we were youngsters, but we did become almost like siblings as we fought and argued over silly things, schemed over other equally inane stuff as kids are wont to do, and we were often indignant when our mutual friends would say such things as "Wouldn't it be funny if your parents got married and you two became brother and sister?" No! Scott and I did not think this sounded funny, cool, or anything good at all! We were aghast at such a thought! We both liked and respected the other's parent, but to combine and become siblings? That was entirely a different scenario that we never anticipated.
     Mrs. Harvey moved to Napoleon Ave, near Whitehall, and Alice followed suit by moving to Barnett Rd., just about a fourth of a mile from Mrs. Harvey as she babysat Angie. Dad, Kym, and I continued to live in the Manor until December 18, 1972, when dad moved us to Pataskala, a small town about 18 miles east of Columbus. We were far from Alice, Scott, and Angie, though we still saw them occasionally.
     In May of 1974, dad came home and announced that he and Alice had gotten married! Kym and I were shocked as we often asked dad if he was going to marry Alice and he'd tell us no. So back off to Columbus we moved, and back fulltime into the lives of these people whom we'd had such a long and unusual relationship with. Now they were our family, and Scott and I were truly that brother and sister we used to so vehemently deny would ever happen! Because we'd known each other so intimately in the Manor, and because we went to school together and had many of the same friends, the transition was simple.
     I got married in November of 1974, so I left home and was no longer a direct part of this close group of people as I had once been. Scott and I saw each other occasionally on the holidays, a few times a year, and that was it. Then in 1977 I moved back to the Manor, and Scott was living just down the street from me on Gould Rd., but we ran in different circles and did not see each other too often. In 1978 I headed back to Pataskala and Scott headed off to St. Pete in Florida to attend school. Again we were living distant.
     Scott came back from Florida sometime in the early 80's, eventually moved out to Pataskala where we would see each other more often, though I had a family and he was single, so we didn't exactly hang out. He often called me and we talked a lot on the phone. This would become a lifelong habit up until just a few months before Scott became too sick to call me, just a few weeks before he passed away.
     Scott and I talked on the phone almost daily, sometimes up to 5 times a day for more than 20 years. My husband Bob used to get irritated with this, but he eventually got used to it. Scott would also call me to let me know when a special show was on like "A Charlie Brown Christmas" or "The Wonderful Wizard of Oz". The phone would ring and Bob would roll his eyes and say, "That'll be your dad or brother calling to tell you that your show is on", and he would be derisive about it. I'd just tell him he was jealous and pick up the phone and it would be either my dad or Scott. If I was talking to Scott, then dad would be calling in; if I were talking with dad, then Scott would be trying to call in. My family has my back! Scott always looked out for me just as you would expect any big brother to do. And my dad still calls me when there is a show he knows I like or thinks I should watch.     
     Scott was an excellent cook who could make foods up out of nothing. He had some kind of magic knack for using fresh herbs and pulling foods together to make the most luscious of dishes. He worked in restaurants most of his life, he catered for awhile with a friend of his, and he often cooked for friends. Scott catered sit down weddings and all kinds of fancy dinners. His food was always a hit.
     Scott was employed with First Community in Grandview, working as a cook in the Assisted Living building. He had special meals he'd make for the residents and they all loved him. He had just gotten his own office and computer in October of 2008, just three months before he had to go on leave once the cancer was diagnosed. The summer of 2008, Scott had gotten permission to put in an herb garden so he would have fresh herbs for cooking. That garden is now dedicated to Scott and is called the Richard Herb Garden.
Scott was so disappointed that just as he had begun to 'make it' that he had had to leave. Scott
 would never return to work, but he was so proud of himself for what he'd accomplished, and we were very proud of him. too.
     I've always said I could open up a diner as my cooking is on the "homecookin" level, the comfort foods that everyone loves and requests. I couldn't cook gourmet very well as I don't like much of what constitutes gourmet food and I would not have the patience; besides, I prefer down home meals that I grew up with. Scott cooked gourmet, though he could also cook down home. He always put his own spin on foods and made them shine above the others. His recipes were often adopted by the restaurants where he worked, and even First Community asked for many of his sauces and recipes as the residents missed them when he could no longer work. Scott didn't cook out of cook books, he cooked from the heart. He would make a roast of lamb or a brisket, and perhaps he'd have juniper berries and bay leaves in the sauce, but it was always so good that people wanted more and enjoyed his foods.
     Scott had signature dishes that were all his own that he had developed and perfected. At this time I am only going to post a few of his recipes as some I want to keep as his own secret family recipes, though some of his friends also have copies of his signature dishes. But though Scott gave you a recipe, he often left out some of an ingredient or part of the recipe so that you did not have the entire thing. He also added things as he was cooking that he may not have written down. But no matter, his dishes were delicious!
     Scott did not bake. His idea of baking was to buy Pillsbury slice and bake cookies and ice them with a tub of Betty Crocker frosting, but he would sometimes call me to ask me how to make something he was making for the residents in First Community. He always said he was the cook and I was the baker. He loved some of the baked goods I made, especially my Cherry Bit Cookies, which I will post much later on. These were his favorites. And so Scott and I would trade our secrets, his cooking ones and my baking ones.
     I miss Scott! He was the very best brother!!! He was always there for me. He was always a phone call away, and I enjoyed our talks. We often talked about our youth, our growing up years, the time we lived in the Manor, and all the capers we did as kids. He was a lot of fun! Always the practical jokester. Scott was also close to Kym and Angie, but Scott and I were so close in age, had many of the same friends, and just had a relationship that you don't often find even in biological families. I'm so glad God blessed me with Scott for a brother, and I am so grateful for all the years we knew one another. How many people can say that their first boyfriend became their beloved brother? I am indeed very blessed. And you will be blessed with the recipes of his that I will share with all of you. Remember, if these seem to be missing something, they most likely are as Scott never completely gave his recipes away. Enjoy!
 

Wednesday, March 31, 2010

Chicken Casserole





Everyone is familiar with this dish as it shows up in many versions at most potlucks and picnics. Grandma made this dish around 1975 and she loved it. She would often make this when she knew I was coming to visit as she knew I loved it, too. Grandpa would not eat chicken, but grandma would. This was a small enough dish that between grandma and I we could eat quite a bit and maybe leave her some for lunch the next day. It is easy, delicious, and a wonderful dish to have on cold days. If you can make your own stuffing it would be even better as you could control the ingredients that go into this dish. I sometimes make a white sauce with a natural chicken base or chicken stock in place of milk for the condensed soup.

Chicken Casserole

3-4 pieces chicken (Boneless, skinless chicken breasts work best)
1 box Stovetop Stuffing
1 can (10 3/4 oz) cream of chicken soup
1/2 can milk

Cook chicken by poaching or baking until done. Cut or tear into bite-sized pieces. Layer chicken in bottom of a 9"x9" baking pan. Prepare Stovetop while chicken is cooking. Combine soup and milk and pour evenly over chicken. Spoon stuffing over top of soup. Bake at 350 degrees for 35 minutes till hot and bubbly.

Carrot Walnut Bread



This is another recipe that Grandma had clipped out of The Columbus Dispatch Magazine and paper-clipped to Helen's cook book. This one was dated June 27, 1976.

Carrot Walnut Bread

2 1/2 cups sifted flour
2 tsp. baking powder
1 tsp. baking soda
1/2 tsp. salt
1 1/2 tsp. cinnamon
1/2 tsp. cloves
1 lb. carrots (about 5 medium)
3 cups water
3/4 cup butter
3/4 cup sugar
4 eggs
2/3 cup milk
1 cup chopped walnuts
1 cup golden raisins

Sift flour, baking powder, baking soda, salt, cinnamon, and cloves; set aside.
Pare carrots; cut slice off tops. Cut into small pieces and place in saucepan with water. Bring to a boil. Cover and cook for 20-25 minutes or until carrots are very tender and water is absorbed. Mash carrots; set aside.
Cream together butter and sugar. Add carrots and beat thoroughly. Add eggs and  milk; beat. Stir in sifted dry ingredients, nuts, and raisins.
Line bottoms of two greased 8 1/2"x4 1/2"x2 1/2" pans with waxed paper. Turn batter into pans. Bake at 350 degrees for 55-60 minutes or till cake tests done. Turn out of pans, remove waxed paper, and turn right side up on racks to cool. When cool, wrap and store overnight before cutting.

Apple Walnut Turnovers



Grandma had cut this recipe out of the Columbus Dispatch Magazine Section and placed it with a paper clip in Aunt Helen's cook book as it was dated July 11, 1976.


Apple Walnut Turnovers

2 cups flour
2 tsp. sugar
1/2 tsp. salt
2 tsp. baking powder
3/4 cup shortening*
5 Tbls. milk
3 medium baking apples
3 Tbls. chopped walnuts
3-4 Tbls. brown sugar
1 tsp. cinnamon
1/4 tsp. nutmeg
2 Tbls. butter, divided

Sift flour, sugar, salt, and baking powder. Cut in shortening*. Stir in milk to moisten dough. Roll out as for pie dough. Cut into six 5 inch squares. Pare, core, and dice apples. Place in bowl with walnuts, brown sugar, and spices. Toss to coat. For each turnover place about 3 Tbls. of apple mixture in center of each square. Dot with 1 tsp. butter. Moisten edges of pastry. Fold pastry corners over to form triangle and press edges together with a fork. Space turnovers 1/2 inch apart on ungreased cookie sheet. Place in preheated 450 degree oven. Immediately reduce heat to 375 degrees and bake 20-25 minutes, till golden brown. You can drizzle with confectioner's sugar icing.
*You can replace the shortening with lard or palm shortening for a healthier version. I prefer the palm shortening, which can be purchased by Tropical Traditons on their website.

Monday, March 29, 2010

Cereal Grains




Corn Meal and Oatmeal

In The Searchlight cook book one can find recipes for cereal grains. Many people today have forgotten how to make some of these foods. I am going to focus on corn and oatmeal since these are widely consumed foods in our culture. Try to buy only organic corn as 90% of all corn and corn products in the USA are GMO. Steel cut or old fashioned oatmeal is the best for you.

Corn Meal Mush

1/2 cup corn meal
 2 3/4 cups boiling water
3/4 sp. salt

Sprinkle cornmeal, stirring rapidly, into rapidly boiling water. Add salt. Cook thrity minutes over direct heat, or over hot water in double boiler one hour.

Fried Mush

Prepare corn meal mush. Pour while hot into pan or mold which has been rinsed with cold water. Smooth the surface of mush. Cool until firm. Cut into 3/4" slices. Brown in hot fat. This is the same mush sold in stores except this is fresher and better for you as there are no preservatives. Serve with warmed syrup or however you enjoy your fried mush. Also serve with bacon or sausage on the side.

Oatmeal Gruel

1/4 cup rolled or flaked oats
4 cups boiling water

Slowly sprinkle cereal into rapidly boiling water. Boil rapidly, stirring occasionally, for 30 minutes. Strain. This is good for those who are ill and need something nourishing, but who cannot tolerate solid foods.

Oatmeal Patties

Leftover oatmeal may be packed into a one pound can and stored in the refrigerator until needed. Remove oatmeal from mold, cut into 1/2" slices, and fry in hot cooking fat until well-browned on both sides. Serve with hot sausage and syrup.

Helen's Poison For House Ants


No one likes ants, but this is one way to easily get rid of them. Years ago there were not the plethora of bug sprays, traps, and killers like we have today. Helen obviously used this recipe often.

Helen's Poison For House Ants

Dissolve one pound of sugar in a quart of hot water. Add 125 grains of sodium aninate*. The mixture should be boiled and strained, cooled, then used with a sponge.
*I cannot find "sodium aninate" anywhere, but this recipe is identical to those where boric acid is used. If you can still find boric acid (look on the web if you can't find it locally) then you can make your own bug eradicator. Boric acid will kill more than ants and is a safe product to keep around the house, though all products should be kept up safe away from small children.

Helen's Untitled II




This recipe seems to be a home remedy for a blood purifier, kidney cleanser, or a cold remedy. It is for certain a recipe that Helen used often as it was written prominently in her book. Lemons are very good for the kidneys and they are good for digestion. And since this has Epsom salts it could be used for the bowels. Use at your own discretion.

Helen's Untitled II

1 pint hot water*
1 Tbls. cream of tartar
1 Tbls. sugar
3 Tbls. Epsom Salts
Juice of 4 large lemons

Take wine glass 3 times a day.
*1 pint equals 2 cups.

Helen's Untitled I



This is a relish recipe that would be nice to try this year when all of you have too many tomatoes and don't know what to do with them all, or towards the end of the year when you have too many unripe tomatoes and a frost is coming. I am sure Helen made many jars of this each year.

Helen's Untitled I

1 quart red tomatoes
3 quart green tomatoes
1 cucumber
3 red peppers
3 green peppers
1 spoon mustard
2 cups sugar
1 quart vinegar

Salt, let stand overnight. Boil 20 minutes.
*This is all the information Helen wrote out. I will leave it up to you to find a similar recipe and try your hand at this. If I make this later on in the year when we have tomatoes, I will write out the directions I use.

Helen's Pickled String Beans



This is a good way to can some of those extra beans you have each year. Make sure you use tender young beans for best results.

Helen's Pickled String Beans

4 quarts string beans, fresh or canned
1 cup sugar
1 quart vinegar*
2 Tbls. mixed spices*

Wash fresh string beans. Remove strings. Cover with water to which 1/2 tsp. salt has been added per quart. Cook till tender. Cover with a pickling syrup made with sugar, vinegar, and spices. Boil 10 minutes.
*The mixed spices would be pickling spices.
*The vinegar would be white vinegar.
*My directions: Once the beans are cooked, drain them. Bring the syrup to a boil  (sugar, vinegar, and spices). Arrange beans in sterilized pint jars. Pour hot syrup over top to within 1/2". Wipe off rim of glass with a clean rag. Place on lid and screw bands (that you have placed in hot water). You can process for 10 minutes as Helen indicated or allow the jars to seal themselves.

Helen's Chili Sauce


Helen's Chili Sauce

2 quarts peeled, chopped, ripe tomatoes
2 green peppers, chopped
2 Tbls. salt
1 Tbls. mustard
1 tsp. nutmeg
2 onions, chopped
1 pimiento, chopped
3 cups vinegar
1 tsp. cinnamon
2 Tbls. sugar

Combine spices, sugar, mustard, and vinegar. Add remaining ingredients. Cook slowly, stirring frequently, about 1 1/2 hours.
You can place this in hot sterilized half pint jars and seal as for jelly.

Helen's Bran Rolls


It may seem I am promoting certain brands here, but in reality this is the way Helen had this recipe written out. As usual, there are scant directions. I will try to make them up for you. I do like the fact that this recipe can be made up and then used for weeks by keeping it in the refrigerator. Please note that if you do keep this to use for the weeks it calls for that the dough will take on a characteristic sour dough taste as it will turn into a sour dough. There are similar recipe to this one available on the web and in cook books, including ones that use Raisin Bran instead of just the bran flakes.

Helen's Bran Rolls

1 1/2 cups Kellogg's Bran Flakes
1 cup lard*
Dissolve the above in 1 cup boiling water and let cool
2 yeast cakes in 1 cup warm water*
2 eggs, beaten light
3/4 cup sugar
2 tsp. salt
6 cups Gold Medal Flour

Add 2 cups flour, then eggs, then yeast, then flour. Put in ice box. Take out 2 hours before baking. 400 degrees, 20 minutes.
My directions: Dissolve the lard in the boiling water. Add the cereal to the lard mixture. Dissolve 2 cake yeasts in 1 cup warm water for about 5 minutes; set aside. Add 2 cups flour and eggs to the lard mixture and beat well to mix. add the yeast water and the remaining flour; beat well. Either take out amount wanted and fill muffin cups and allow to rise  for 1 1/2 hours, or cover well and place in refrigerator until needed. Bake muffins at 400 degrees for 20 minutes.
*You can replace the lard with shortening, but it will not be as healthy, nor will you get the same flavor.
*Do not have water for yeast over 115 degrees or you will kill your yeast. Two pkgs. of yeast from a 3-strip of yeast will work in place of the cake yeast.
*If you want more clarity then look for an updated recipe on the Internet or in cook books.

Helen's Fondant


Helen's Fondant

2 cups sugar
1/2 cup water
1/8 tsp. cream of tartar

Combine sugar and cream of tartar. Add water. Stir until sugar is dissolved. Cover pan and boil 5 minutes, allowing steam to dissolve any grains of sugar on sides of pan. Uncover and boil without stirring to soft ball stage (234-236 degrees). Wipe all crystals from sides of pan with a damp cloth. Pour into a shallow pan, plate, or onto a marble slab which has been rinsed with cold water. Cool to room temperature. Beat only until stiff enough to knead. Knead until smooth. Place in bowl and cover with damp cloth or waxed paper. Allow to stand 24 hours before using. If desired, milk may be used in place of water.
*Fondant always needs a time to ripen so make sure you let it sit the 24 hours.
*This candy can be used in many ways, including being dipped in chocolate.

Mints from the fondant:
Melt fondant over hot water* and add peppermint, spearmint, or wintergreen flavorings. Tint with food coloring. Drop by tsps. onto waxed paper. Mints may be dipped in chocolate.
*Use a double boiler for best results.
*There are many flavorings available today from Lorann foods. You can choose one of these, if desired.

Helen's Lemon Ice Cream


Yum! I love ice cream. Lemon sounds so very refreshing!

Helen's Lemon Ice Cream

2 eggs
2 cups milk, scalded
6 Tbls. sugar
2 Tbls. lemon juice*
1 1/2 tsp. lemon flavoring*
1/8 tsp. salt
1 1/2 cups evaporated milk or cream

Beat eggs until whites and yolks are blended. add sugar and salt. Mix well. Add milk slowly, stirring constantly. Cook over hot water until mixture coats spoon. Remove from fire. Chill. Add flavoring, lemon juice, and cream or evaporated milk. Freeze. If desired, food coloring can be added. 8 servings.
*Use a real lemon and ream the juice fresh.
*Lemon flavoring is most likely extract.
*Cook this over a double boiler.

Sunday, March 28, 2010

Helen's Russian Drops


Another recipe we are left in the dark about. But making cookies is not difficult  and so I will write out the directions as I think they should be written. These sound very good.

Helen's Russian Drops

1 1/2 cups sugar
1 cup butter or lard
3 eggs, beaten separately
1 tsp. soda in 2 tsp. milk
1 cup sour cream
1 tsp. cinnamon
1 pound walnuts*
1 pound seeded raisins
pinch salt
3 cups sifted flour

Drop with spoon. Make small.
*My directions:  Preheat oven to 350 degrees. Sift together flour, cinnamon, and salt; set aside. Cream sugar and lard. Add eggs, one at a time, and beat well after each addition. Add in milk/soda and sour cream, blend well. Beat in flour mixture. Fold in raisins and nuts. Drop by tsps. onto lightly greased cookie sheets. Bake at 350 degrees for 8-10 minutes. Cool on wire racks.
*Chop walnuts before adding
*Pecans could also be used in place of the walnuts.

Helen's Mince Meat Cookies


Dear Helen just did not write the directions out very well for most of her recipes. She knew how to make all of them, and she obviously was not thinking about her descendants who would be trying to decipher how to make them almost 50 years later. If you like mince meat then these cookies should hit the spot with you.

Helen's Mince Meat Cookies

1 pkg. mince meat
1 cup water
1 cup lard
1 1/2 cups sugar
2 eggs, slightly beaten
1/2 tsp. salt
1 tsp. baking soda
3 1/2 cups sifted flour
1 cup nuts

Put water in mince meat. Cream sugar and lard. Combine flour, salt, soda, and nuts. Bake in moderate oven.
*You can substitute shortening or butter for the lard, though you will lose flavor and health if you use shortening, and if you use butter the cookies may be somewhat softer.
*Bake cookies at 350 degrees for 8-10 minutes. If needed, bake a minute or two longer. Do not overbake.

Helen's Pineapple Drop Cookies


Here's a delicious sounding fruit cookie. Though the directions are not super clear it should be easy to figure out. I imagine these could be easily doubled.

Helen's Pineapple Drop Cookies

1/4 cup butter
3/4 cup sugar
1 1/4 cups flour
1 egg
pinch salt
1/4 cup drained crushed pineapple*
1/4 tsp. baking soda
1/2 tsp. baking powder
1/4 cup nut meats


Cream butter and sugar. Add remaining ingredients. Mix well and drop by 1/2 tsp. on cookie sheet. Bake 375 degrees.
*Bake 8-10 minutes. Do not overbake.
*If desired, take the reserved pineapple juice and mix with enough powdered sugar to make a glaze that you can drizzle on cookies when they are cooled.

Helen's Gum Drop Cookies

Here is another recipe that Helen wrote very little information with. This is a bar cookie, we know this from the admonition to "cut into squares", and also by the long cooking time.

Helen's Gum Drop Cookies

4 eggs, beaten light
2 cups light brown sugar
2 cups sifted flour
1 Tbls. water
1 cup chopped gum drops*
1 cup nuts
1 tsp. cinnamon
pinch salt

Bake half hour on cookie sheet in slow oven. Cut in squares. Use red and green gum drops at Christmas.
*Preheat oven to 300 degrees. Sift together flour, salt, and cinnamon; set aside. Beat tpgether eggs, brown sugar, and water. Add flour mixture to the batter and blend well. Fold in gum drops and nuts. Grease a 13"x9" pan and spread mixture evenly into pan. Bake at 300 degrees for 30 minutes. Cut into squares.
*Do not use black gum drops (licorice flavored).
*Use a pair of scissors dipped in cold water to cut the gum drops and keep them from sticking.

Helen's Cookies


These were simply marked "Cookies". There were literally no directions*, though I will write what Helen wrote, and then I will give some basic directions. These are a molasses spice cookie that would be good for afternoon tea or anytime one needs a snack.

Helen's Cookies

1/2 cup butter
1 cup brown sugar
1 egg
1/3 cup molasses
1 1/2 tsp. cinnamon
1 1/2 tsp. nutmeg
1 1/2 tsp. ginger
1/4 tsp. salt
1/2 cup sour cream
1 tsp. soda in hot water*
2 1/2 cups flour
1 tsp. baking soda

Drop from tsp. Add nuts and raisins, if desired.
*My directions: Preheat oven to 375 degrees. Sift together the flour, spices, and salt; set aside. Cream butter and sugar; add egg and molasses and beat well. Add the sour cream, mix thoroughly, then add the baking soda dissolved in 1 tsp. hot water, beat to mix. Beat in flour mixture and mix well. If using raisins and nuts, use 1/2-3/4 cup each and fold in. Drop by tsps. onto lightly greased cookie tins. Bake at 375 degrees for 8-10 minutes. Remove to cooling racks to cool.

Saturday, March 27, 2010

Helen's Fruit Cookies



Nothing like an old fashioned cookie to make one nostalgic. This recipe is written out exactly as it was in Helen's cook book.

Helen's Fruit Cookies

1 pkg. mince meat
1 1/4 cups water, stew till thick.
Cream 1 1/2 cups sugar with 3/4 cups melted shortening *(cooled). Add 1 beaten egg and 1 scant tsp. salt. Dissolve 1.2 tsp. soda in cooled mince meat. Put 1 tsp. baking powder in 3 1/2 cups flour sifted. Blend all ingredients together thoroughly and drop from spoon on buttered tin. Bake 8-10 minutes in hot oven.*
*Bake at 400 degrees.
*You could replace the shortening with butter to make them healthier.

Helen's Walnut Ice Cream Cookies


Do not let these cookies decieve you by their name. They do not have ice cream in them, but they were made to be eaten with ice cream, most likely vanilla. These cookies would have been small and would have been a nice accompaniment to a scoop of ice cream for dessert.

Helen's Walnut Ice Cream Cookies

1/2 cup butter*
1/3 cup sugar
1 egg
1/2 tsp. vanilla
1 1/4 cups flour
1/4 tsp. salt
1/2 cup chopped nuts

Cream butter and sugar. Add and vanilla and beat well. Sift flour and salt and blend into mixture. Stir in walnuts. Drop by tsp. onto cookie sheet*. Bake at 375 degrees for 10 minutes. Remove to wire racks to cool. Makes 3 1/2-4 dozen cookies.
*Use room temperature butter
*Lightly grease the cookie sheet before baking.
*These cookies were traditionally served with ice cream, hence the name.

Helen's Ice Box Rolls


These are very easy rolls to make as there is no kneading involved. I love a good roll with dinner.

Helen's Ice Box Rolls

3/4 cup milk
1/4 cup sugar
3Tbls. butter
1 tsp. salt
1 cake yeast*
1/4 cup warm water
1 egg
3 1/2 cups flour

Scald milk. Pour over sugar, salt, and btter in mixing bowl. Cool to lukewarm. add yeast softened in warm water, beaten egg; add about 1/2 flour. Beat thoroughly. Add remaining flour. Mix well. Grease top of dough slightly. Cover with waxed paper and towel. Store in ice box* until needed. About 2 1/2 hours before baking take from ice box and shape into rolls. Cover and let rise until doubled in bulk (about 2 hours). Bake in moderately hot oven (375 degrees). Recipe can be doubled with success.
*The ice box would be the same as a refrigerator today.
*You can replace the cake yeast with one envelope active dry yeast.

Helen's Chocolate Pudding

The picture above is what is known as a steam cover or pan that would be used to make a steamed pudding. Helen would have used something similar to the one pictured here to make this pudding. When we think of pudding we think of the creamy concoctions made with milk, sugar, cornstarch, egg yolks and flavorings, but several decades ago a pudding was a steamed bread like the one written out here.

Helen's Chocolate Pudding

3 Tbls. butter
2/3 cup sugar
1 egg, well beaten
1 cup milk
4 tsps. baking powder
1/8 tsp. salt
2 1/2 squares chocolate*
2 1/4 cups flour

Melt chocolate over hot water. Cream butter with sugar. add egg; beat thoroughly. Sift flour, measure and sift with baking powder and salt. Add alternately with milk to first mixture. Add chocolate. Pour into well-buttered miold cover. Steam for 30 minutes. Serve with any desired sauce.
*The chocolate would be unsweetened chocolate such as Baker's.

Helen's Christmas Pudding


Here is another steamed pudding that was made special for Christmas, though this one does not contain prunes,  it does contain other dried fruits commonly used at Christmas.

Helen's Christmas Pudding

1 cup ground suet*
1 cup molasses
1 cup milk
3 1/2 cups flour
1 tsp. salt
1/4 tsp. nutmeg
1 tsp. baking soda
2 tsp. cream of tartar
1 tsp. cinnamon
1/4 tsp. cloves
1 cup raisins
1/2 cup currants
1/2 cup finely chopped citron

Combine suet, molasses, and milk. Sift flour, measure, reserve 1/4 cup for dredging fruits. Sift remainder of flour with salt, spices, cream of tartar, and soda. Combine with first mixture. Add dredged fruits. Mix thoroughly. Fill well-oiled one pound cans 2/3 full. Cover. Steam 3 hours.
Grind suet in a meat grinder or food processor. Do not substitute other fats for the suet.

Helen's Prune Pudding


Here is a cooked version of Prune Pudding. Prune Pudding used to be a very popular dessert. It still is in some quarters where women continue to make this traditional food.

Helen's Prune Pudding

1 cup dry bread crumbs
1 cup flour
1 cup ground suet*
1 cup sugar
1 cup thick prune pulp
3 tsp. baking powder
3 eggs, well beaten
3/4 tsp. salt
1/2 tsp. cinnamon
1/4 tsp. cloves
1 cup milk

Sift flour, measure, then sift with salt, spices, and baking powder. Prepare prune pulp by rubbing cooked prunes through a sieve. Combine pulp, suet, crumbs, sugar, milk, and eggs. Add dry ingredients and mix well. Pour into well-oiled 1 pound cans. Cover. Steam 2 hours. Serve with hard sauce. Serves 8.
*Suet is beef fat that can be purchased at most grocery stores in the meat case. Grind the suet in a meat grinder or a food processor. Do not substitute other fats for the suet.

Helen's Uncooked Plum Pudding


This might be something you'd want to make for the holidays, particularly Christmas when this dish would be most popular. If I was to make this dish I would omit the citron.

Helen's Uncooked Plum Pudding

1 cup cooked prunes
1 cup Grapenuts or rolled graham crackers*
2 cups boiling water
1/2 tsp. salt
4 Tbls. gelatin*
2 Tbls. corn syrup
4 Tbls. fruit juice
1/2 cup sugar
1/2 cup finely chopped citron
1 Tbls. lemon juice*
1/4 cup cold water
1/2 tsp. allspice
1 tsp. cinnamon
2 egg whites, stiffly beaten*
1 cup raisins

Soften gelatin in cold water. Dissolve in boiling water. Add all ingredients except egg whites. Mix thoroughly, then chill until partially set. Fold in egg whites. Pour into long shallow pan. Chill until firm. Cut in squares with sharp knife. Serve with whipped cream. Serves 8.
*Rolled graham crackers are merely crackers crushed and rolled with a rolling pin. You can use the blender.
*This would be non-flavored gelatin like Knox brand.
*Use a real lemon that you have reamed for juice.
*Since these are uncooked egg whites, use eggs from a trusted farmer so you will greatly lessen your chances of contracting salmonella from factory-farmed eggs.